Tue, 11 Sep 2007
The government is planning steps to ensure that domestic cooking oil prices ease by 10% to 15% in the next few weeks, a senior government official said on Wednesday (5/9/07).

"We cannot afford cooking oil prices to remain high as our main festival season of Ramadhan and Idul Fitri is approaching," Djoko Said Damardjati, Director General of Processing and Marketing at the Agriculture Department, told Reuters on the sidelines of a regional grains conference in Perth.

The previous week, the government introduced a new palm oil export scheme in a fresh bid to contain soaring cooking oil prices.

Under the new tax scheme, the government will set the export tax for crude palm oil at 10% if international prices are above $850 a ton, at 7.5% if prices are between $750 and $849 a ton and 5% if international prices are between $650 and $749 a ton.

In a bid to ensure affordable prices of cooking oil, the government has also allocated Rp325 billion ($34.57 million) to subsidize cooking oil for the poor.

The subsidized cooking oil will be sold to low-income families in special markets for three months, starting during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadhan in the middle of September and after the Idul Fitri festival in October.


Wed, 12 Sep 2007
From: JakChat
Comment by Dilli
This seems to go against the government decision for consumers to use LPG?

Sounds like two dogs pulling at different leashes to me!


Wed, 12 Sep 2007
From: JakChat
Comment by KuKuKaChu
"cooking oil" in this case does not mean fuel oil, but oil for cooking/frying. indonesians use *heaps* of this, being one of the "9 basic commodities" (sembako) for ordinary people, thus its importance ...

of course, price of cooking oil is presently being driven up by the demand for palm oil for producing biodiesel.


Wed, 12 Sep 2007
From: JakChat
Comment by Dilli
I was refering to the information in this article from last weeks JP...

Bekasi residents in kerosene craze
City News - September 07, 2007


BEKASI: A kerosene agent in Jl. Teuku Umar, Bekasi, was overwhelmed Thursday as Rawalumbu district residents gathered early in the morning to collect cooking fuel supplies.

Atun, 36, had been in the queue for almost two hours.

"We ran out of kerosene yesterday," she said.

The long queue forced agent Zaenal Abidin to limit buyers to a maximum of 5 liters of kerosene per household.

The residents have yet to receive their free gas stoves and gas fuel cylinders from the central government, as part of an initiative to reduce kerosene subsidies.

"The policy has stalled the distribution of kerosene over the past month. I don't have the money to buy a gas stove and the cylinder myself," said Maryati of Sepanjangjaya subdistrict.

Many of the residents had gone back to using firewood as fuel for cooking, pending delivery of a kerosene supply to the agent.

Zaenal said he previously received 5,000 liters of kerosene each week from state oil and gas producer Pertamina's depot in North Jakarta.

"But following the announcement of the conversion (from kerosene to gas as cooking fuel) program, I now receive less than 5,000 liters per fortnight and only if I pay Rp 1.5 million to the depot official as a down payment to ensure delivery," he said. -- JP



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