Thu, 30 Sep 2010
Jakarta (ANTARA News) - The habit of always being late (rubber time) is unacceptable at business companies in Japan, President Director of PT. Itochu Indonesia Takuji Motooka said.

He made the remarks in a seminar on "Work Ethics at Japanese Companies and Its Culture Background," held here on Wednesday.

"Many Indonesian employees had a "cultural shock" when working with a Japanese company and facing difficulties in adaptations, especially fresh graduates," Takuji Motooka said.

The fact that rubber time has become a tradition caused Indonesian workers often suffering a cultural shock when working with Japanese companies known for their high time discipline.

But Motooka also considered cultural difference as no excuse in international economic activities.

"By holding the brief seminar introducing work ethics at Japanese companies, prospective workers with working potentials working with Japanese companies will become acquainted with the culture and work ethics at Japanese companies," Motooka said.

The seminar divided into several sessions covered business ethics, Five-S (Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu, Shitsuke) as standardized work system applied at Japanese companyies Ho Ren So (reporting, contacts, and consultation), and inter-cultural communications in doing business.

The participants are very enthusiastic following the program and asked questions on the subject under discussion, such as on the habit of giving presents from business colleagues who are visiting their hosts.

The habit called "omiyage" was seen as something which could increase the relations between the business players increasing their emotional and professional closeness between colleagues in doing business.

The event held at The Plaza Office Building in Jakarta involved scores of students of various universities projected to work at foreign companies, in Japan in particular, after they finished their study at the university.

According to statistics of the Investment Agency (BKPM), foreign investment in Indonesia reached 14,871 million US dollars, 9.18 percent of which are Japanese investment, making Japan the second biggest foreign investor in Indonesia.

Japan as an important player in trade in Southeast Asia, Indonesia in particular, offered highly potential jobs for Indonesians, Motooka said. (*)


Thu, 30 Sep 2010
From: JakChat
Comment by Om Pong
Quoting: biznews


"Many Indonesian employees had a "cultural shock" when working with a Japanese company and facing difficulties in adaptations, especially fresh graduates," Takuji Motooka said.



Heh heh. Yes I'll bet. I'm sure it's the shock of their fuckin' lives.


Thu, 30 Sep 2010
From: JakChat
Comment by KuKuKaChu
most indonesians would consider japanese employers as "tidak manusiawi" for their demands that people behave like robots, or as little cogs in humungous wheels. they might have a point, you know.


Thu, 30 Sep 2010
From: JakChat
Comment by Om Pong
Well don't the Japanese often spark out on the job because they work so hard? Indonesia represents the other end of the spectrum. In the West people increasingly work flexi-time which is progress I'd say. The difference between flexi-time and jam karet seems clear though, namely that when people ARE actually in the office they may actually DO SOME FUCKING WORK.



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